EDUCATION CENTER2020-06-03T22:24:23-04:00

Treatment Timeline

Here’s what you can expect from the time you pick up the phone, to the time you go home.

Free Helpline
Available 24/7

You don’t have to be ready, you just have to call. We can chat about your struggles or go over real treatment options.
Our helpline is 100% free, 100% anonymous, and available 24/7.
You can verify your insurance benefits below.

24/7 Admissions Staff

Medical
Detox

Everybody’s physical needs are different. Our medical staff makes sure that our clients get the attention they need to remain comfortable throughout this uncomfortable process.
All of our patients have around the clock access to our nursing staff.

medical-detox-staff

Inpatient Residential Treatment

Our residential program extends the 24 hour access to nursing, but also includes more than 40 clinical hours a week of group and individual therapy. The treatment approaches include Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Trauma Therapy and Family sessions. An example of our schedule can be found here.

Inpatient Residential Treatment

Outpatient
Treatment

Establishing a plan is a crucial for continued sobriety. Our dedicated clinicians will assist in coming up with a game plan that leads to success. Whether continuing treatment locally in Florida or out of state, you will not leave Chapel Hill without knowing your next step.

Outpatient Treatment Group

Free Helpline
Available 24/7

You don’t have to be ready, you just have to call. We can chat about your struggles or go over real treatment options.
Our helpline is 100% free, 100% anonymous, and available 24/7. You can verify your insurance benefits below.

24/7 Admissions Staff

Medical
Detox

Everybody’s physical needs are different. Our medical staff makes sure that our clients get the attention they need to remain comfortable throughout this uncomfortable process.
All of our patients have around the clock access to our nursing staff.

medical-detox-staff

Inpatient
Residential Treatment

Our residential program extends the 24 hour access to nursing, but also includes more than 40 clinical hours a week of group and individual therapy. The treatment approaches include Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Trauma Therapy and Family sessions. An example of our schedule can be found here.

Inpatient Residential Treatment

Outpatient
Treatment

Establishing a plan is a crucial for continued sobriety. Our dedicated clinicians will assist in coming up with a game plan that leads to success. Whether continuing treatment locally in Florida or out of state, you will not leave Chapel Hill without knowing your next step.

Outpatient Treatment Group

Frequently Asked Questions

I’m overwhelmed.2019-10-29T16:22:20-04:00

People fly in from all over the country to attend treatment at our facility. Its an everyday event for us. We can understand if it feels overwhelming, but it shouldn’t be. Getting help for yourself is the most natural thing in the world. We help people through the process, tell them what to expect, tell them what to bring and what not to bring. It takes a long time for somebody to realize they have an addiction problem, it shouldn’t take a long time to get help.

I have financial questions.2019-10-29T16:22:27-04:00

Of course you do, that’s only natural. An advisor is available to speak with you 24 hours a day with regards to cost of treatment.

Most people use insurance. Dealing with insurance policies can be rather confusing, so we will walk you through the entire process, including giving you a detailed explanation of your policy’s out-of-pocket maximums and get you a bottom line answer for your financial questions. In many cases, we can work with families on a payment plan or even complete financial hardship forms.

I can’t convince my loved one to go.2019-10-29T16:22:32-04:00

We have incredible licensed interventionists on staff. We have successfully performed in home interventions for a number of different families. Your loved one may need to hear from somebody who has been through this before.

You can’t help me.2019-10-29T16:22:37-04:00

You’re not alone. And if you don’t call, we can’t help. Many of us have been exactly where you are. We were hopeless and thought all was lost. Until we discovered that rock bottom was fertile grounds for the seeds of a personal revolution. Call today, and let us prove you wrong.

Now is not a good time.2019-10-29T16:22:41-04:00

If not now, then when? Its never “a good time”. The point is, to continue the path of alcoholism and drug addiction will only lead to self destruction. There is only right now.

There are assistance programs that will help people keep their jobs while seeking addiction treatment and your job is guaranteed by law. Call us and we’ll explain.

How do I know if I need treatment?2019-10-29T16:22:45-04:00

The signs of drug use and addiction vary from person to person. If you’re questioning if you need help, chances are that the answer is yes. We offer a 24-hour helpline where an Advisor can assist you in figuring out which program is best for you.

What is Drug Addiction Treatment?2019-10-29T16:22:49-04:00

Drug treatment is intended to help addicted individuals stop compulsive drug seeking and use. Treatment can occur in a variety of settings, take many different forms, and last for different lengths of time. For many, treatment is a long-term process that involves multiple interventions and regular monitoring.

Programs We Offer

Millions of American adults struggle with alcohol-related problems, with those between the ages of 18 and 25 at the highest risk of abuse. Alcohol is also one of the most commonly abused substances amongst teenagers. Between the high rates of adult and teenage abuse, alcohol-related detox programs have become a necessity.

In this day and age, the majority of young Americans unwittingly live their lives according to the dictates of alcoholism. Binge drinking has become a social norm, and those in high school and college are exceedingly likely to develop an alcohol-related disorder of some degree. Regular consumption of alcohol can lead to eventual dependency – in addition to the numerous health challenges that come with frequent consumption, drinking too much alcohol can be deadly.

Why reach for something that will steadily (or quickly) destroy your life, when you could reach for something that will only make it greater? Look to Chapel Hill Detox Center for the best available care, and for the life you truly deserve to be living.

While drinking alcohol may be considered ‘normal’ (at least to a certain extent), too much of it can be life-threatening, and alcohol is one of the most difficult drugs to detox from. But with medical care and professional guidance, you can still enjoy a normal life – a life that you are in charge of, rather than a life run by alcohol.

Get Detox Care Like No Other

Despite the what type of the issue you’re battling, and the severity of the issue at hand, our team of thoroughly trained and dedicated medical supervisors at Chapel Hill Detox Center are available to help. Our medical staff will comprehensively examine your personal case, interview you, and formulate a customized plan of care to help move along your healing process.

Meet Our Serene and State-of-Art Medical Facility

Once your case has been admitted, we at Chapel Hill will ensure that you immediately begin an effective and efficient process of healing. We are extremely serious when it comes to comfort, privacy, and medication, and we also believe in the importance of luxury. Our house-keepers ensure that your room is kept clean, your cable TV is working properly, your bed is made, and our professional chefs will provide you with an incredible culinary experience. You will also be able to enjoy our serene and social living environment. Your time at Chapel Hill will vary depending on how you choose to spend it. We organize movie nights, game night, and a wide array of other social activities. We ensure that you will meet and socialize with a large group of new (and likely lifelong) friends.

Dedicated and Experienced Medical Clinicians

Our experienced and dedicated doctors are always on standby – once you have been admitted into our center, our doctors will monitor your response to treatment on a regular basis, and administer medications (if need be). In our center, staff members are available 24/7 to assist you with anything you may need.

Our physician, as well as our clinicians, check up on clients daily, monitoring their health and well-being; our medical staff administers and monitors the prescription medications we utilize in order to help our clients manage their withdrawal symptoms and alleviate their discomfort. You will have access to our staff 24 hours a day for all the help and support that you could possibly need.

While drinking alcohol may be normal to an extent, too much of it can be very deadly and one of the most difficult to detox one off. But with medical experience, you can still enjoy a normal life – with you in charge and not alcohol.

You don’t have to wait another day. For more information on our comprehensive program for Alcohol Detox, contact the addiction treatment professionals at Chapel Hill Detox today.

Heroin abuse in America is on the rise, and according to Center for Diseases Control, 467,000 Americans abuse heroin regularly. Deaths related to heroin overdose rose by over 20 percent in the United States in recent years, and 15,446 individuals lost their lives to heroin in 2016. Considering these statistics, heroin is one of the most potent and deadly illicit substances available, and the dependence rates are extremely troublesome. Out of every four individuals that try this dangerous substance, one will become addicted. Chapel Hill Detox Center is dedicated to helping those already in the grip of heroin addiction, and to actively engaging in any and all preventative measures.

How can we help you?

Heroin abuse brings you closer to death on a daily basis – heroin is an extremely potent drug, and because of its strength, dependency rates remain exceptionally high. While the health and social challenges related to heroin are vast, quitting completely and going on to lead a normal life is possible. However, because this drug is so addictive, long-term recovery is generally only possible with the assistance of a professional detox facility.

The truth is, no two detox experiences will be the same. However, while heroin is a fast acting drug that absorbs into the bloodstream instantly, it takes at least 5 to 7 days for the body to totally filter out all of the remnants of the drug. For those who have been abusing heroin for years, or who abuse heroin in great amounts, the detox process will take at least 10 days. The symptoms attached to heroin withdrawals can be immensely uncomfortable, and lead many newly sober individuals straight back to use. In order to undergo heroin detox successfully, you will need the assistance of a quality detox center – and that’s why we are here for you.

Our team of medical professionals

Going through the detox process all by yourself – without the supervision of a medical professional – can be very dangerous. Attempting to detox at home may also greatly hinder – or completely destroy – the beginning stages of your recovery process.

Our team medical professionals, physicians, and clinicians ensures that you will be monitored closely, in order to help facilitate your personal journey of recovery.

In the process of treating the disease of addiction, we understand that the heroin withdrawal and detox stages are the most difficult. At Chapel Hill, we understand the issues that heroin detox may present. Our doctors work carefully to assist the withdrawal symptoms and the detox process, working to make things as comfortable as possible, while simultaneously ensuring that our clients and staff members are safe.

When an avid drug abuser finally gives up heroin, physical and psychological symptoms will begin to occur. The physical and mental effects depend on the stage of addiction, as well as any potential co-occurring disorders. Not only is our staff well-versed in substance abuse, but many of our staff members have extensive backgrounds in psychology and mental health. We take everything into consideration, and provide the most comprehensive care available.

Luxury and serene healing environment

Our high-tech facility is truly second to none; we strive to provide our clients with an environment that is clean, serene, luxurious, and extremely conducive to healing the body, mind, and soul. We understand the importance of environment, and we believe that living in ideal conditions can contribute to the overall healing process. Our well-trained housekeepers always ensure your comfort in our beautifully furnished rooms. Our line of great chefs remains on standby, always willing and able to provide you with a wholesome and nourishing diet that will ultimately aid in your recovery process.

You don’t have to wait another day. For more information on our comprehensive program for Alcohol Detox, contact the addiction treatment professionals at Chapel Hill Detox today.

In recent years, national attention on drug abuse has been focused more and more on drugs like cocaine – a highly addictive drug that has lead to innumerable deaths across the country. According to recent reports, cocaine usage and availability has risen for the first time in more than five years.

Reports from different governmental agencies throughout the US concluded that:

  • 2015 saw the highest amount of deaths from cocaine abuse in the US since 2006.
  • 61 percent of young Americans from 2013 to 2015 admitted to trying cocaine.

Cocaine addiction can be devastating, and those who are detoxing from this specific drug will experience a host of serious and potentially life-threatening symptoms. Treating the symptoms of cocaine-related detox takes experience and dedication, seeing as many physical and psychological symptoms can last for several weeks. We at Chapel Hill have extensive experience treating all the symptoms related to cocaine withdrawal and have experienced great success in helping numerous individuals along the path to long-term recovery.

Cocaine Abuse

Cocaine is an illicit and highly addictive drug. Ironically enough, cocaine was once used medicinally. However, the medical community quickly discovered its addictive and dangerous properties, and eventually outlawed it altogether. If you are struggling with cocaine abuse or addiction, seeking professional medical care is of utmost importance. If you are unsure as to whether or not you are struggling with cocaine abuse, or if you believe someone you love may be battling addiction, there are several signs to look for. Abnormal excitement, unexplained mood swings, and severely decreased appetite (leading to weight loss) may be indicators of an existing problem. More signs may include:

  • The individual may experience regular nosebleed, or have a consistently runny nose.
  • The pupils of the individual may become dilated.
  • The individual may become unnecessarily aggressive, excitable, or talkative.

Cocaine Abuse and Involved Risk

There is both short and long-term risk involved in cocaine abuse. As far as the short term, users may experience severe depression during the ‘come down’ (as the initial high begins to fade). Given the dependency level of cocaine, and the numerous risks associated with abusing this substance, cocaine is one of the most dangerous substances known to man. Below are some of the short time risk of cocaine abuse:

  • Headaches
  • Paranoia
  • Frequent nosebleeds
  • Decreased appetite
  • Sexual impotency
  • Heart-related issues (increased heart rate, potential heart attack)
  • Seizures or convulsions

With long-term abuse, individuals may also experience strokes, kidney failure, lung damage, and, in some instances, fatality. Issues related to cocaine abuse and addiction will persist and worsen until professional care is sought.

Additional risks related to long-term use may include:

  • Psychosis
  • Insomnia
  • Cognitive issues
  • Inflammation of the nasal septum
  • Collapsed naval cavities
  • Coma

Withdrawal Symptoms

One of the most important steps towards becoming addiction-free is admitting that a problem exists, and taking the necessary steps to tackle it. Withdrawing from cocaine is different than withdrawing from many other drugs, seeing as it tends to be more psychological than physical. The withdrawal process will typically last from between 7 and 10 days. After the last usage, the abuser may experience any of the above-listed withdrawal symptoms as soon as within the next hour.

The withdrawal symptoms may include lack of appetite, depression, fatigue, apathy, anhedonia, and suicidal ideation.

Cocaine Detox Program

While cocaine addiction is on the rise throughout the US, American men and women are beginning to seek better and more effective treatment measures. While those in the grips of active addiction may feel that leading a drug-free life is near impossible, recovery is always an option. Chapel Hill Detox is dedicated to providing top-quality treatment to those battling the life-threatening disease of addiction.

Our Team of Medical Specialists

Addiction is complicated, and some of the psychological symptoms may persist for months – even years, in some cases. Those who use cocaine regularly may experience cravings for years after use is ceased. Fortunately, our team of dedicated doctors and mental health professionals is always on standby. They are available to check in with past clients at any time, suggesting options for aftercare and help along the recovery process. Our comprehensive treatment program and supportive environment makes Chapel Hill one of the best facilities for drugs and alcohol detoxification in the US.

You don’t have to wait another day. For more information on our comprehensive program for Cocaine Detox, contact the addiction treatment professionals at Chapel Hill Detox today.

Methadone, an opioid painkiller, is a legal opioid therapy used to treat individuals suffering from addiction to other opioid drugs (such as heroin). When taken under the supervision of a medical expert, methadone can be very beneficial as a short-term treatment for other, more lethal opiate addictions. However, it is important to note that methadone should only be used as a short-term treatment, and use should always be monitored by a team of medical professionals. The substance itself is highly addictive, and can quickly lead to dependency if misused.

We at Chapel Hill have developed a comprehensive and effective detox program for those suffering from methadone addiction. Not only will we educate our clients on the risks involved with methadone use, we will work with them to develop a plan of action that does not include substance use of any kind.

Methadone Abuse, Symptoms and Risk Involved

Although methadone can be very helpful in treating other opioid addictions, when abused, it can pose a great deal of health complications and social challenges. Using any amount of this substance (outside of the legal prescription) is considered drug abuse. Abusing methadone has killed thousands of Americans – in fact, methadone-related overdose is one of the leading causes of accidental death nationwide.

The symptoms related to methadone abuse and addiction mimic the symptoms of addiction to illicit opioids, such as heroin. Some of the most common indications of methadone abuse include fatigue or lethargy, constricted pupils, and compromised motor functions. Other symptoms may include decreased appetite, low blood pressure, decreased heart rate, and tremors.

According to a report by CDC America, there were 784 methadone-related deaths in 1999 alone. In 2006, an overwhelming 5,406 Americans lost their lives to methadone abuse. In 2007, there were 5,518 fatalities. Clearly, methadone is a major player in the nationwide opioid epidemic.

Both the short-term and the long-term risks related to methadone abuse can be devastating.

Short-term risks may include:

  • Immense difficulty breathing due to respiratory depression
  • Cyanosis
  • Tremors
  • Low blood pressure
  • Nausea and vomiting

The long-term risks may include:

  • Depression and anxiety
  • Brain and/or liver damage
  • Hallucinations
  • Suicidal ideation

Withdrawal Symptoms

When taken other than as prescribed, methadone can be very addictive. If an individual uses small amounts of methadone for an extended period of time, he or she will likely develop a tolerance. When the physical body becomes accustomed to using methadone in order to function normally, a physical dependency will begin to develop. After a dependency develops, the individual will experience symptoms of withdrawal upon ceased use.  We at Chapel Hill Detox are well-versed in the reduction of methadone withdrawal symptoms.  Symptoms of withdrawal related to methadone may include:

  • Fever
  • Abnormal sweating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Stomach cramping
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Paranoia
  • Intense cravings
  • Insomnia or disrupted sleep patterns

Our Team of Medical Specialists

We at Chapel Hill Detox understand that withdrawing from methadone can be physically painful and psychologically intense. For this reason, our team of dedicated medical professionals is constantly available to reduce the severity of mental and physical symptoms. Our luxurious accommodations lend themselves to quick and effective recovery.

You don’t have to wait another day. For more information on our comprehensive program for Methadone Detox, contact the addiction treatment professionals at Chapel Hill Detox today.

Benzodiazepines (more commonly known as “benzos”) are a group of addictive pharmaceutical medications. Benzodiazepines have become exceedingly common, and are typically used to treat conditions related to anxiety. The most commonly abused benzodiazepines are Klonopin, Xanax, and Ativan, amongst a variety of others. They may be considered minor tranquilizers, but they are among the most addictive drugs in America and can present a wide range of serious issues to those that abuse them.

According to a 2013 report conducted by researchers at Psych Central (PC), the most prescribed drug in America is Xanax. Ativan is the 5th most prescribed medication, and Valium is the 9th most prescribed. Just because a drug is prescribed in great amounts, it is not necessarily safe. In fact, the majority of those struggling with benzodiazepine addiction originally obtained the drugs from a friend or close relative. Prescriptions that are not properly stored or disposed of can be easily found, taken, and abused.

We at Chapel Hill Detox have ample experience dealing with the symptoms of benzodiazepine withdrawal. Our team of experienced professionals will take every necessary step to ensure that your withdrawal symptoms are as mild and manageable as possible.

Benzodiazepines Abuse – Symptoms and Risks
Like other legal pharmaceutical medications, benzodiazepines are initially prescribed by medical experts to alleviate the symptoms of pre existing medical conditions. However, when these drugs are abused, individuals are likely to develop a physical and mental dependence. Some of the signs and symptoms of benzodiazepine abuse include:

  • Slurred speech
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Weakness
  • Confusion and dizziness
  • Drowsiness and fatigue
  • Decreased coordination

Benzodiazepine Abuse
The FDA recently reported that approximately 50 million Xanax prescriptions were written in the USA alone. 28 million Ativan prescriptions, 27 million Klonopin prescriptions, 15 million Valium prescriptions, and 9 million Restoril prescriptions were also written. Of course, the greater the number of prescriptions, the higher the potential rates of abuse. Within the past several years alone, benzodiazepine abuse and addiction have become more prevalent than ever before.

According to a report on the Journal of Family Practice, benzodiazepine abuse-related deaths rose five times from 1999 to 2009. This specific drug can greatly affect blood pressure, body temperature, and breathing rate. Some other risks of benzodiazepine misuse include:

  • Muscle stiffness
  • Hallucinations
  • Extreme confusion and agitation
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Arrhythmia
  • Ataxia

Withdrawal Symptoms
Those who have been abusing benzodiazepines for an extended period of time will likely experience a host of unpleasant (and potentially dangerous) withdrawal symptoms. Some of these symptoms may include:

  • Abnormal sweating
  • Paranoia
  • Dizziness
  • Headaches
  • Loss of appetite
  • Depression
  • Hallucinations

Our Team of Medical Specialists
We at Chapel Hill Detox are available to help you begin your journey of recovery. The first step in any recovery journey is freeing your body and mind of chemical substances. Attempting to detox at home can be dangerous, and almost always results in a return to use. In order to begin living a fulfilling and meaningful life free from substance abuse, attending a professional detox program is a necessary first step. Our state-of-the-art facility and unparalleled professionalism make us one of the leading detox programs in the nation. We pride ourselves on treating each of our clients with respect and dignity, and on forging relationships that will last a lifetime.

You don’t have to wait another day. For more information on our comprehensive program of Benzodiazepine Detox, contact the addiction treatment professionals at Chapel Hill Detox today.

The term “opiate” covers an extremely wide range of drugs, including both prescriptions medications and illicit substances. In recent times, heroin and prescription painkillers have become the most frequently and widely used opiates. This is largely due to the fact that prescriptions painkillers are so easy to obtain. According to the CDC (Center of Disease Control), the number of opioid prescriptions has been climbing rapidly since the early 1990s. From 1999 to 2016, over 200,000 Americans lost their lives to painkiller overdose. While the number of painkiller-related fatalities was high in 1999, it had more than quadrupled by 2016. In 2010 alone, it was estimated that nearly 210 million opiate prescriptions were filled nationwide (prescribing rates peaked between 2010 and 2012).

Unfortunately, because prescription painkillers are legally prescribed, many individuals will overlook their potential for abuse or addiction. If it’s prescribed by a doctor, it has to be safe – right? Unfortunately, the opposite is true. Those that take prescription painkillers for longer than prescribed or in higher doses than prescribed are exceptionally likely to develop a physical and mental dependency. The CDC also reported that in 2017, there were 58 painkiller prescriptions written for every 100 Americans. That means that over half of all American men and women have been prescribed an addictive narcotic painkiller at least once during their lifetimes.

As prescription rates began to climb, cases of painkiller-related addiction also began to skyrocket. Increased fatalities brought about stricter prescribing laws, and the government began to crack down on distribution. Unfortunately, thousands of Americans were already deep in the throws of opioid addiction. Because they were no longer able to obtain painkillers, many switched to a cheaper and far more readily available alternative – heroin. NIDA (The National Institute of Drug Abuse) reports that nearly 80 percent of all individuals who are seeking treatment for heroin addiction first began by abusing prescription painkillers. Unlike painkillers, which are synthetically manufactured, heroin is naturally derived from the seed pod of the opium poppy plant. Regardless of how heroin is used (it can be snorted, injected, or smoked), it enters the brain rapidly, and induces feelings of euphoria. Heroin works by binding to opioid receptors within the brain, and greatly affects heart rate, breathing, and feelings of pain and pleasure. Aside from feelings of euphoria, heroin use commonly causes dry mouth, flushing, decreased motor functioning, and “nodding” (moving back and forth between consciousness and unconsciousness). Long-term use can have much more severe effects, ranging from collapsed veins, liver and kidney disease, and sexual dysfunction to mental health issues, heart failure, and death.

All opiates are highly addictive, and using heroin presents a host of other issues, such as the risk of accidentally injecting fentanyl, which oftentimes lead to respiratory failure, overdose, and fatality. Those who overdose on heroin alone have a much higher rate of resuscitation. In most instances, they arrive to the emergency room alive, where they can be quickly treated with naloxone (an opioid blocker and antidote). If heroin is laced with fentanyl, however, rates a resuscitation are not nearly as high. Because this drug is significantly more potent than heroin, side effects are far more severe, and overdose occurs far more quickly. When fentanyl is involved, the necessary 1 to 2 mg of naloxone jumps to 30 to 5 times that amount.

If you are currently struggling with opioid abuse or addiction, it is extremely important that you seek professional care as quickly as possible. It was reported that in 2016 alone, there were nearly 42,249 opioid-related deaths. Out of all of these fatalities, nearly 50 percent (19,413) were directly related to fentanyl. For more information on opioid abuse or treatment for painkillers, heroin, and other opioid narcotics, please feel free to reach out today.

Programs We Offer

Millions of American adults struggle with alcohol-related problems, with those between the ages of 18 and 25 at the highest risk of abuse. Alcohol is also one of the most commonly abused substances amongst teenagers. Between the high rates of adult and teenage abuse, alcohol-related detox programs have become a necessity.

In this day and age, the majority of young Americans unwittingly live their lives according to the dictates of alcoholism. Binge drinking has become a social norm, and those in high school and college are exceedingly likely to develop an alcohol-related disorder of some degree. Regular consumption of alcohol can lead to eventual dependency – in addition to the numerous health challenges that come with frequent consumption, drinking too much alcohol can be deadly.

Why reach for something that will steadily (or quickly) destroy your life, when you could reach for something that will only make it greater? Look to Chapel Hill Detox Center for the best available care, and for the life you truly deserve to be living.

While drinking alcohol may be considered ‘normal’ (at least to a certain extent), too much of it can be life-threatening, and alcohol is one of the most difficult drugs to detox from. But with medical care and professional guidance, you can still enjoy a normal life – a life that you are in charge of, rather than a life run by alcohol.

Get Detox Care Like No Other

Despite the what type of the issue you’re battling, and the severity of the issue at hand, our team of thoroughly trained and dedicated medical supervisors at Chapel Hill Detox Center are available to help. Our medical staff will comprehensively examine your personal case, interview you, and formulate a customized plan of care to help move along your healing process.

Meet Our Serene and State-of-Art Medical Facility

Once your case has been admitted, we at Chapel Hill will ensure that you immediately begin an effective and efficient process of healing. We are extremely serious when it comes to comfort, privacy, and medication, and we also believe in the importance of luxury. Our house-keepers ensure that your room is kept clean, your cable TV is working properly, your bed is made, and our professional chefs will provide you with an incredible culinary experience. You will also be able to enjoy our serene and social living environment. Your time at Chapel Hill will vary depending on how you choose to spend it. We organize movie nights, game night, and a wide array of other social activities. We ensure that you will meet and socialize with a large group of new (and likely lifelong) friends.

Dedicated and Experienced Medical Clinicians

Our experienced and dedicated doctors are always on standby – once you have been admitted into our center, our doctors will monitor your response to treatment on a regular basis, and administer medications (if need be). In our center, staff members are available 24/7 to assist you with anything you may need.

Our physician, as well as our clinicians, check up on clients daily, monitoring their health and well-being; our medical staff administers and monitors the prescription medications we utilize in order to help our clients manage their withdrawal symptoms and alleviate their discomfort. You will have access to our staff 24 hours a day for all the help and support that you could possibly need.

While drinking alcohol may be normal to an extent, too much of it can be very deadly and one of the most difficult to detox one off. But with medical experience, you can still enjoy a normal life – with you in charge and not alcohol.

You don’t have to wait another day. For more information on our comprehensive program for Alcohol Detox, contact the addiction treatment professionals at Chapel Hill Detox today.

Heroin abuse in America is on the rise, and according to Center for Diseases Control, 467,000 Americans abuse heroin regularly. Deaths related to heroin overdose rose by over 20 percent in the United States in recent years, and 15,446 individuals lost their lives to heroin in 2016. Considering these statistics, heroin is one of the most potent and deadly illicit substances available, and the dependence rates are extremely troublesome. Out of every four individuals that try this dangerous substance, one will become addicted. Chapel Hill Detox Center is dedicated to helping those already in the grip of heroin addiction, and to actively engaging in any and all preventative measures.

How can we help you?

Heroin abuse brings you closer to death on a daily basis – heroin is an extremely potent drug, and because of its strength, dependency rates remain exceptionally high. While the health and social challenges related to heroin are vast, quitting completely and going on to lead a normal life is possible. However, because this drug is so addictive, long-term recovery is generally only possible with the assistance of a professional detox facility.

The truth is, no two detox experiences will be the same. However, while heroin is a fast acting drug that absorbs into the bloodstream instantly, it takes at least 5 to 7 days for the body to totally filter out all of the remnants of the drug. For those who have been abusing heroin for years, or who abuse heroin in great amounts, the detox process will take at least 10 days. The symptoms attached to heroin withdrawals can be immensely uncomfortable, and lead many newly sober individuals straight back to use. In order to undergo heroin detox successfully, you will need the assistance of a quality detox center – and that’s why we are here for you.

Our team of medical professionals

Going through the detox process all by yourself – without the supervision of a medical professional – can be very dangerous. Attempting to detox at home may also greatly hinder – or completely destroy – the beginning stages of your recovery process.

Our team medical professionals, physicians, and clinicians ensures that you will be monitored closely, in order to help facilitate your personal journey of recovery.

In the process of treating the disease of addiction, we understand that the heroin withdrawal and detox stages are the most difficult. At Chapel Hill, we understand the issues that heroin detox may present. Our doctors work carefully to assist the withdrawal symptoms and the detox process, working to make things as comfortable as possible, while simultaneously ensuring that our clients and staff members are safe.

When an avid drug abuser finally gives up heroin, physical and psychological symptoms will begin to occur. The physical and mental effects depend on the stage of addiction, as well as any potential co-occurring disorders. Not only is our staff well-versed in substance abuse, but many of our staff members have extensive backgrounds in psychology and mental health. We take everything into consideration, and provide the most comprehensive care available.

Luxury and serene healing environment

Our high-tech facility is truly second to none; we strive to provide our clients with an environment that is clean, serene, luxurious, and extremely conducive to healing the body, mind, and soul. We understand the importance of environment, and we believe that living in ideal conditions can contribute to the overall healing process. Our well-trained housekeepers always ensure your comfort in our beautifully furnished rooms. Our line of great chefs remains on standby, always willing and able to provide you with a wholesome and nourishing diet that will ultimately aid in your recovery process.

You don’t have to wait another day. For more information on our comprehensive program for Alcohol Detox, contact the addiction treatment professionals at Chapel Hill Detox today.

In recent years, national attention on drug abuse has been focused more and more on drugs like cocaine – a highly addictive drug that has lead to innumerable deaths across the country. According to recent reports, cocaine usage and availability has risen for the first time in more than five years.

Reports from different governmental agencies throughout the US concluded that:

  • 2015 saw the highest amount of deaths from cocaine abuse in the US since 2006.
  • 61 percent of young Americans from 2013 to 2015 admitted to trying cocaine.

Cocaine addiction can be devastating, and those who are detoxing from this specific drug will experience a host of serious and potentially life-threatening symptoms. Treating the symptoms of cocaine-related detox takes experience and dedication, seeing as many physical and psychological symptoms can last for several weeks. We at Chapel Hill have extensive experience treating all the symptoms related to cocaine withdrawal and have experienced great success in helping numerous individuals along the path to long-term recovery.

Cocaine Abuse

Cocaine is an illicit and highly addictive drug. Ironically enough, cocaine was once used medicinally. However, the medical community quickly discovered its addictive and dangerous properties, and eventually outlawed it altogether. If you are struggling with cocaine abuse or addiction, seeking professional medical care is of utmost importance. If you are unsure as to whether or not you are struggling with cocaine abuse, or if you believe someone you love may be battling addiction, there are several signs to look for. Abnormal excitement, unexplained mood swings, and severely decreased appetite (leading to weight loss) may be indicators of an existing problem. More signs may include:

  • The individual may experience regular nosebleed, or have a consistently runny nose.
  • The pupils of the individual may become dilated.
  • The individual may become unnecessarily aggressive, excitable, or talkative.

Cocaine Abuse and Involved Risk

There is both short and long-term risk involved in cocaine abuse. As far as the short term, users may experience severe depression during the ‘come down’ (as the initial high begins to fade). Given the dependency level of cocaine, and the numerous risks associated with abusing this substance, cocaine is one of the most dangerous substances known to man. Below are some of the short time risk of cocaine abuse:

  • Headaches
  • Paranoia
  • Frequent nosebleeds
  • Decreased appetite
  • Sexual impotency
  • Heart-related issues (increased heart rate, potential heart attack)
  • Seizures or convulsions

With long-term abuse, individuals may also experience strokes, kidney failure, lung damage, and, in some instances, fatality. Issues related to cocaine abuse and addiction will persist and worsen until professional care is sought.

Additional risks related to long-term use may include:

  • Psychosis
  • Insomnia
  • Cognitive issues
  • Inflammation of the nasal septum
  • Collapsed naval cavities
  • Coma

Withdrawal Symptoms

One of the most important steps towards becoming addiction-free is admitting that a problem exists, and taking the necessary steps to tackle it. Withdrawing from cocaine is different than withdrawing from many other drugs, seeing as it tends to be more psychological than physical. The withdrawal process will typically last from between 7 and 10 days. After the last usage, the abuser may experience any of the above-listed withdrawal symptoms as soon as within the next hour.

The withdrawal symptoms may include lack of appetite, depression, fatigue, apathy, anhedonia, and suicidal ideation.

Cocaine Detox Program

While cocaine addiction is on the rise throughout the US, American men and women are beginning to seek better and more effective treatment measures. While those in the grips of active addiction may feel that leading a drug-free life is near impossible, recovery is always an option. Chapel Hill Detox is dedicated to providing top-quality treatment to those battling the life-threatening disease of addiction.

Our Team of Medical Specialists

Addiction is complicated, and some of the psychological symptoms may persist for months – even years, in some cases. Those who use cocaine regularly may experience cravings for years after use is ceased. Fortunately, our team of dedicated doctors and mental health professionals is always on standby. They are available to check in with past clients at any time, suggesting options for aftercare and help along the recovery process. Our comprehensive treatment program and supportive environment makes Chapel Hill one of the best facilities for drugs and alcohol detoxification in the US.

You don’t have to wait another day. For more information on our comprehensive program for Cocaine Detox, contact the addiction treatment professionals at Chapel Hill Detox today.

Methadone, an opioid painkiller, is a legal opioid therapy used to treat individuals suffering from addiction to other opioid drugs (such as heroin). When taken under the supervision of a medical expert, methadone can be very beneficial as a short-term treatment for other, more lethal opiate addictions. However, it is important to note that methadone should only be used as a short-term treatment, and use should always be monitored by a team of medical professionals. The substance itself is highly addictive, and can quickly lead to dependency if misused.

We at Chapel Hill have developed a comprehensive and effective detox program for those suffering from methadone addiction. Not only will we educate our clients on the risks involved with methadone use, we will work with them to develop a plan of action that does not include substance use of any kind.

Methadone Abuse, Symptoms and Risk Involved

Although methadone can be very helpful in treating other opioid addictions, when abused, it can pose a great deal of health complications and social challenges. Using any amount of this substance (outside of the legal prescription) is considered drug abuse. Abusing methadone has killed thousands of Americans – in fact, methadone-related overdose is one of the leading causes of accidental death nationwide.

The symptoms related to methadone abuse and addiction mimic the symptoms of addiction to illicit opioids, such as heroin. Some of the most common indications of methadone abuse include fatigue or lethargy, constricted pupils, and compromised motor functions. Other symptoms may include decreased appetite, low blood pressure, decreased heart rate, and tremors.

According to a report by CDC America, there were 784 methadone-related deaths in 1999 alone. In 2006, an overwhelming 5,406 Americans lost their lives to methadone abuse. In 2007, there were 5,518 fatalities. Clearly, methadone is a major player in the nationwide opioid epidemic.

Both the short-term and the long-term risks related to methadone abuse can be devastating.

Short-term risks may include:

  • Immense difficulty breathing due to respiratory depression
  • Cyanosis
  • Tremors
  • Low blood pressure
  • Nausea and vomiting

The long-term risks may include:

  • Depression and anxiety
  • Brain and/or liver damage
  • Hallucinations
  • Suicidal ideation

Withdrawal Symptoms

When taken other than as prescribed, methadone can be very addictive. If an individual uses small amounts of methadone for an extended period of time, he or she will likely develop a tolerance. When the physical body becomes accustomed to using methadone in order to function normally, a physical dependency will begin to develop. After a dependency develops, the individual will experience symptoms of withdrawal upon ceased use.  We at Chapel Hill Detox are well-versed in the reduction of methadone withdrawal symptoms.  Symptoms of withdrawal related to methadone may include:

  • Fever
  • Abnormal sweating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Stomach cramping
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Paranoia
  • Intense cravings
  • Insomnia or disrupted sleep patterns

Our Team of Medical Specialists

We at Chapel Hill Detox understand that withdrawing from methadone can be physically painful and psychologically intense. For this reason, our team of dedicated medical professionals is constantly available to reduce the severity of mental and physical symptoms. Our luxurious accommodations lend themselves to quick and effective recovery.

You don’t have to wait another day. For more information on our comprehensive program for Methadone Detox, contact the addiction treatment professionals at Chapel Hill Detox today.

Benzodiazepines (more commonly known as “benzos”) are a group of addictive pharmaceutical medications. Benzodiazepines have become exceedingly common, and are typically used to treat conditions related to anxiety. The most commonly abused benzodiazepines are Klonopin, Xanax, and Ativan, amongst a variety of others. They may be considered minor tranquilizers, but they are among the most addictive drugs in America and can present a wide range of serious issues to those that abuse them.

According to a 2013 report conducted by researchers at Psych Central (PC), the most prescribed drug in America is Xanax. Ativan is the 5th most prescribed medication, and Valium is the 9th most prescribed. Just because a drug is prescribed in great amounts, it is not necessarily safe. In fact, the majority of those struggling with benzodiazepine addiction originally obtained the drugs from a friend or close relative. Prescriptions that are not properly stored or disposed of can be easily found, taken, and abused.

We at Chapel Hill Detox have ample experience dealing with the symptoms of benzodiazepine withdrawal. Our team of experienced professionals will take every necessary step to ensure that your withdrawal symptoms are as mild and manageable as possible.

Benzodiazepines Abuse – Symptoms and Risks
Like other legal pharmaceutical medications, benzodiazepines are initially prescribed by medical experts to alleviate the symptoms of pre existing medical conditions. However, when these drugs are abused, individuals are likely to develop a physical and mental dependence. Some of the signs and symptoms of benzodiazepine abuse include:

  • Slurred speech
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Weakness
  • Confusion and dizziness
  • Drowsiness and fatigue
  • Decreased coordination

Benzodiazepine Abuse
The FDA recently reported that approximately 50 million Xanax prescriptions were written in the USA alone. 28 million Ativan prescriptions, 27 million Klonopin prescriptions, 15 million Valium prescriptions, and 9 million Restoril prescriptions were also written. Of course, the greater the number of prescriptions, the higher the potential rates of abuse. Within the past several years alone, benzodiazepine abuse and addiction have become more prevalent than ever before.

According to a report on the Journal of Family Practice, benzodiazepine abuse-related deaths rose five times from 1999 to 2009. This specific drug can greatly affect blood pressure, body temperature, and breathing rate. Some other risks of benzodiazepine misuse include:

  • Muscle stiffness
  • Hallucinations
  • Extreme confusion and agitation
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Arrhythmia
  • Ataxia

Withdrawal Symptoms
Those who have been abusing benzodiazepines for an extended period of time will likely experience a host of unpleasant (and potentially dangerous) withdrawal symptoms. Some of these symptoms may include:

  • Abnormal sweating
  • Paranoia
  • Dizziness
  • Headaches
  • Loss of appetite
  • Depression
  • Hallucinations

Our Team of Medical Specialists
We at Chapel Hill Detox are available to help you begin your journey of recovery. The first step in any recovery journey is freeing your body and mind of chemical substances. Attempting to detox at home can be dangerous, and almost always results in a return to use. In order to begin living a fulfilling and meaningful life free from substance abuse, attending a professional detox program is a necessary first step. Our state-of-the-art facility and unparalleled professionalism make us one of the leading detox programs in the nation. We pride ourselves on treating each of our clients with respect and dignity, and on forging relationships that will last a lifetime.

You don’t have to wait another day. For more information on our comprehensive program of Benzodiazepine Detox, contact the addiction treatment professionals at Chapel Hill Detox today.

The term “opiate” covers an extremely wide range of drugs, including both prescriptions medications and illicit substances. In recent times, heroin and prescription painkillers have become the most frequently and widely used opiates. This is largely due to the fact that prescriptions painkillers are so easy to obtain. According to the CDC (Center of Disease Control), the number of opioid prescriptions has been climbing rapidly since the early 1990s. From 1999 to 2016, over 200,000 Americans lost their lives to painkiller overdose. While the number of painkiller-related fatalities was high in 1999, it had more than quadrupled by 2016. In 2010 alone, it was estimated that nearly 210 million opiate prescriptions were filled nationwide (prescribing rates peaked between 2010 and 2012).

Unfortunately, because prescription painkillers are legally prescribed, many individuals will overlook their potential for abuse or addiction. If it’s prescribed by a doctor, it has to be safe – right? Unfortunately, the opposite is true. Those that take prescription painkillers for longer than prescribed or in higher doses than prescribed are exceptionally likely to develop a physical and mental dependency. The CDC also reported that in 2017, there were 58 painkiller prescriptions written for every 100 Americans. That means that over half of all American men and women have been prescribed an addictive narcotic painkiller at least once during their lifetimes.

As prescription rates began to climb, cases of painkiller-related addiction also began to skyrocket. Increased fatalities brought about stricter prescribing laws, and the government began to crack down on distribution. Unfortunately, thousands of Americans were already deep in the throws of opioid addiction. Because they were no longer able to obtain painkillers, many switched to a cheaper and far more readily available alternative – heroin. NIDA (The National Institute of Drug Abuse) reports that nearly 80 percent of all individuals who are seeking treatment for heroin addiction first began by abusing prescription painkillers. Unlike painkillers, which are synthetically manufactured, heroin is naturally derived from the seed pod of the opium poppy plant. Regardless of how heroin is used (it can be snorted, injected, or smoked), it enters the brain rapidly, and induces feelings of euphoria. Heroin works by binding to opioid receptors within the brain, and greatly affects heart rate, breathing, and feelings of pain and pleasure. Aside from feelings of euphoria, heroin use commonly causes dry mouth, flushing, decreased motor functioning, and “nodding” (moving back and forth between consciousness and unconsciousness). Long-term use can have much more severe effects, ranging from collapsed veins, liver and kidney disease, and sexual dysfunction to mental health issues, heart failure, and death.

All opiates are highly addictive, and using heroin presents a host of other issues, such as the risk of accidentally injecting fentanyl, which oftentimes lead to respiratory failure, overdose, and fatality. Those who overdose on heroin alone have a much higher rate of resuscitation. In most instances, they arrive to the emergency room alive, where they can be quickly treated with naloxone (an opioid blocker and antidote). If heroin is laced with fentanyl, however, rates a resuscitation are not nearly as high. Because this drug is significantly more potent than heroin, side effects are far more severe, and overdose occurs far more quickly. When fentanyl is involved, the necessary 1 to 2 mg of naloxone jumps to 30 to 5 times that amount.

If you are currently struggling with opioid abuse or addiction, it is extremely important that you seek professional care as quickly as possible. It was reported that in 2016 alone, there were nearly 42,249 opioid-related deaths. Out of all of these fatalities, nearly 50 percent (19,413) were directly related to fentanyl. For more information on opioid abuse or treatment for painkillers, heroin, and other opioid narcotics, please feel free to reach out today.

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